Designing An Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) Architecture As Business Model Protocol (BMP) For Distributed Electronic-Commerce Systems And Applications

  IJCTT-book-cover
 
International Journal of Computer Trends and Technology (IJCTT)          
 
© 2016 by IJCTT Journal
Volume-37 Number-2
Year of Publication : 2016
Authors : Anibrika S.K. Bright, Dr. M. Asante, Ashigbi F. Degadzor, Mustapha M. Adamu
  10.14445/22312803/IJCTT-V37P115

MLA

Anibrika S.K. Bright, Dr. M. Asante, Ashigbi F. Degadzor, Mustapha M. Adamu "Designing An Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) Architecture As Business Model Protocol (BMP) For Distributed Electronic-Commerce Systems And Applications". International Journal of Computer Trends and Technology (IJCTT) V37(2):73-80, July 2016. ISSN:2231-2803. www.ijcttjournal.org. Published by Seventh Sense Research Group.

Abstract -
Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) architecture is considered a platform to realize a service-oriented architecture. An ESB brings flow-related patterns such as transformation and routing of messages and applications through a Service-Oriented Architecture platform (SOA). An ESB can also provide an abstraction of layers for endpoints. This promotes flexibility in the transport layer and easy connection and communication between services. This paper therefore seeks to model and design a service oriented architecture that creates a platform for business modules intercommunication that would establish a reliable protocol to enable efficient and secure interaction between modules and look at the feasibility of implementing an electronic-commerce platform based on the Enterprise Service Architecture (ESA). To achieve these objectives, this paper would consider the Enterprise Service Bus architecture as the blueprint that represents the piece of software residing between the business applications and enables communication among them. Ideally, the ESB should be able to replace all direct contacts with the applications on the bus, so that all communication takes place via the ESB. To achieve this objective, the ESB (Enterprise Service Bus) must encapsulate the functionality offered by its component applications in a meaningful way. This typically occurs through the use of an enterprise message model. The message model defines a standard set of messages and protocols that the ESB will both transmit and receive. In an enterprise architecture making use of an ESB, an application will communicate via the bus, which acts as a message broker between applications and platforms. Such an approach has the primary advantage of reducing the number of point-to-point connections required to allow applications to communicate. This, in turn, makes impact analysis for major software changes simpler, modular and more straightforward. By reducing the number of points-of-contact to a particular application, the process of making a system to changes in one of its components becomes easier. In conclusion faster and cheaper communication between existing systems ensure increased reliability that ensure point-to service solutions to enterprise-wide deployment (distributed bus) and predefined ready-for-use service and application types types. On the other hand, there would be increased overhead and slow down communication speed for those already compatible services and applications.

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Keywords
Deployment, services, application, architecture, bus, protocol.